Author Topic: Virtuemart Dead or Alive ? Whats the roadmap and future ?  (Read 3430 times)

nebojsa

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Re: Virtuemart Dead or Alive ? Whats the roadmap and future ?
« Reply #60 on: April 29, 2021, 22:29:01 pm »
No, it's still the same. Even with cache clear.

zheekan

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Re: Virtuemart Dead or Alive ? Whats the roadmap and future ?
« Reply #61 on: April 29, 2021, 23:03:23 pm »
Anyway, let's continue  ;D

A question, is there any publicly available statistical data about how many users VM has right now?

Troels_E

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Re: Virtuemart Dead or Alive ? Whats the roadmap and future ?
« Reply #62 on: May 07, 2021, 11:31:52 am »
Quote
A question, is there any publicly available statistical data about how many users VM has right now?
Not that I am aware of.

Max will now about DLs and support memberships you can always try and ask if he's got numbers he wants to share.

GJC Web Design

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    • GJC Web Design
  • VirtueMart Version: 3.6.8
Re: Virtuemart Dead or Alive ? Whats the roadmap and future ?
« Reply #63 on: May 07, 2021, 11:43:43 am »
you can see the D/L figures here.. http://dev.virtuemart.net/projects/virtuemart/files
GJC Web Design
VirtueMart and Joomla Developers - php developers http://www.gjcwebdesign.com
VM3 AusPost Shipping Plugin - e-go Shipping Plugin - VM3 Postcode Shipping Plugin - Radius Shipping Plugin - VM3 NZ Post Shipping Plugin - AusPost Estimator
Samport Payment Plugin - EcomMerchant Payment Plugin - ccBill payment Plugin
VM2 Product Lock Extension - VM2 Preconfig Adresses Extension - TaxCloud USA Taxes Plugin - Virtuemart  Product Review Component
http://extensions.joomla.org/profile/profile/details/67210
Contact for any VirtueMart or Joomla development & customisation

dr.spot86

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Hi every one

I followed with extreme interest the thread. I want to talk about some issue that I think are the "missing link".

I talk as a little digital entrepreneur very curious and passionate about market trends and changes.

From my perspective, all can be reconducted to:


1.
VirtueMart lacks a clear idea of what's its position in the market. Build this idea is crucial now.

And it hasn't to see Woocommerce or Shopify. It has to define and communicate its strenght to the right user.


2.
VirtueMart lacks a simple strategy to:

• acquire new users
• pay the bill


--

I talked to Max some weeks ago and give him a little idea. Maybe in the next weeks I'm going to expand on that.

Shortly, I think the solution are:


1.
Go and communicate what VirtueMart is and can do. In the meantime, give a fresh look first to the website and the product at UX / Design level.


2.
• Acquire new customer offering the possibility to sell the first products with ease
• Match developer with end user* and expand / improve the extensions store


*on this, I want to elaborate.

I think that:
- VirtueMart should be free only as a third level domain with a Joomla installation (e.g. myshop.virtuemart.com); this way, dev team shouldn't have to create a fancy wizard that guide you through installation and configuration: simply, they use the same preconfigured store again and again.
No extendability.

- VirtueMart should be paid for installation on own domain; considering the market benchmark, 30-50 / month or 250-300 / year could be acceptable.

- VirtueMart should create an ecosystem of product (extension) with developer that instead of reinventing the wheel every time and compete with each other (why on earth should there be multiple different extensions doing the same thing?), work on few extensions and improve them continuosly.

Hence:
• VM Team -> focuses on VM. No distractions.
• Developers -> focuses on the few extensions that can't be in the core initially, but that could be integrated in the future (why on earth if I have to sell subscription, or product for rent, I have to look for other solutions?)

- In the meantime, developers can also work with end user that want to delegate all the ecommerce developing to them.


How can everyone pay the bill this way?
In the short run, it's simple
• VM -> from VM and fees from extensions + a kind of "certified VM Developers"
• developers -> from selling their extensions + develop for the end users

In the long run, it's a bit more complicated. But ESSENTIAL to understand.
In the long run, things have to change: if VirtueMart and its extensions remain separate, a plateau is reached. It is not avoidable. It is a market. It is physiological for it to happen. VirtueMart must slowly incorporate the functionality of the extensions.

Considering the number (VERY LARGE in absolute terms) of web searches, developers, users, citations and more, that VirtueMart has, instead of many small developers here and there who bring bread home by chasing customers, VirtueMart can become an "organism" that can leverage all this and increase profits in a consistent way.

For the VirtueMart team. And for developers who will join in over time, that can have more active role in VirtueMart, and continue to work with end users.

Obviously, if everyone thinks of pulling water to his mill, and in the meantime wants to continue using VirtueMart expecting an impossible speed if there are no resources (budget, time, energy), all this will implode on himself.

This is a typical non-zero-sum game condition.

Or they all win. Or they all lose. There is no middle ground.
Everyone with a basic understanding of economy / micro-economy could understand this.

And of course, the VirtueMart development team needs to take a more defined position.

I hope this help
And I hope that Max and someone of the VirtueMart Developer Team, will read all this thread. ;)
Vincenzo T | Oukside | oukside.com


zheekan

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@GJC
Thank you, it was interesting to see the numbers. Big, but not as big as I expected, also it looks as the numbers are going down over time.

@dr.spot
Thank you for sharing your thoughts, we all here are asking for something similar to a few of the points you laid out, but you took it to a whole new level  ;D
I don't believe we can expect VM to become what you propose anytime soon, and it's quite possible that it will never be that, but I definitely agree with these points:

1. Go and communicate what VirtueMart is and can do. In the meantime, give a fresh look first to the website and the product at UX / Design level.
2. Acquire new customer offering the possibility to sell the first products with ease

Without that VM will continue to be a tool for advanced users that dont care about UI/UX, and that means even lower numbers from what we can see on the link GJC shared above.


I recommend this article to all of you in this thread (and the VM team also), it's an interesting view on what the market asks for:

https://www.namecheap.com/blog/wordpress-market-share/

elestudiodeandres

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I think it has little future with so much wordpress.

dr.spot86

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Wait up...

Since WordPress allows you to create a website with just the click of a button, those stats aren't very useful from a decision-making point of view.

It simply says "40% of websites run on WordPress".

Well...

How many people do you know who woke up one day and said "I'd like to make a website today" and pressed a button, creating a website that they didn't use?

Examples of useful data would be these:

- How many sites beyond certain monthly visitors run on WordPress
- How many sites offering valuable services are running on WordPress
- How many sites / ecommerce that bill over a certain value run on WordPress
(and in any case it would not be sufficient to have an answer: there are other factors; roles within the company, professionalism, or trivially company objectives, etc.)

Or more simply: how many of 40% are "dead" sites, or started and left there?

It's a very bland statistic ...

It's a bit like gym subscriptions VS sessions with a Personal Trainer (my entrepreneurial spirit is declined in the Fitness area and I'm talking to you from certain data): most people subscribe to the gym by choosing an annual plan .. That never uses!

A Personal Trainer costs 25-40 times more than a gym membership, but when people choose it they start and continue.

And they certainly get results that those who choose gym membership and never go there never get.

It's the same with WordPress VS Joomla. WordPress takes a big chunk of the market by facilitating "initiation" to the web. This does not mean that people "initiated" then do something on the web.

Obviously, the advantage of this operation is there: in the midst of the tide of people who never start, there are people who motivate themselves by starting. They start from a small blog, expand and then put on an ecommerce.

If one starts with a solution (e.g. WordPress) it is difficult to change direction once started.
(this is another reason that changes those stats)

You get to Joomla / VirtueMart because
• or you are already a bit geek
• or you are already inside the web and you understand what "stability / solidity" of a system means (it is not at all obvious!)

For this in point 1 of my answer above I wrote:

Joomla or, better, VirtueMart, should communicate well what it is. Without looking at Shopify / WooCommerce, but communicating what it really is:

"The e-commerce solution for those who are serious about their e-commerce and are not just f**k around"
Vincenzo T | Oukside | oukside.com


zheekan

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@elestudiodeandres
Don't agree at all  ;D I don't believe that VM ever had plans to be number one on the planet and even if they did, they don't have that dream now. But does that mean it's dead? Joomla powers 2.2% of the internet. Let that sink in.

@dr.spot
What I got from that article was that the transition to online marketplace has been accelerated beyond expectations. And of course almost everyone went with the most recognisable and marketed solution, WP/Woo.
But there will be a huge number of companies looking for a better solution once they get fed up with the downsides of the WP/Woo combo.

Let me paste two of the most important parts of that article here:
1. Woo draws users from existing WordPress sites wanting an e-commerce presence*. It also appeals to first-time site builders because unlike Shopify, there are no limits on the free version. You can add unlimited products and connect a payment gateway to create a fully functional store in a snap.

2. The pandemic has accelerated the shift to e-commerce by roughly five years, and according to United Nations Trade and Development Secretary, the shift to a digital world is here to stay. As he put it, “the changes we make now will have lasting effects as the world economy begins to recover.”
Right now, ‘online first’ is the sentiment for many new and established businesses. Yet, as of 2019, less than two-thirds of small businesses had a website. The same study found that:
- small businesses cite cost (26%) and irrelevance to industry (27%) as key reasons behind their decision not to have a website
- 35% of small businesses feel their operation is too small to warrant a website
Fast forward to 2020, and the notion that a business is too small or not suitable for an online presece ceases to exist. Today, whether you’re a freelance nail technician or an organic health food store, without an online presence you give the impression that you’re no longer in business.
As the pandemic pushes consumers and businesses online, the crisis also presents an opportunity. Companies that invest in their online presence will thrive — and where better than a free, well-known platform like WordPress to ease the transition**. It’s an economical and sustainable choice for businesses of any size.

* VM has the same opportunity with Joomla. As I said before, 2.2% of all web sites is a huuuuge number.
**Let me just say it again, there will be a substantial number of businesses that will look for a better solution once they get fed up with the downsides of the WP/Woo combo.